fine sailor

A couple of months ago, I bought a Sailor 1911s [Profit] fountain pen. Since I love their inks so much, I thought I’d familiarize myself with their pens too. I’d never written with a Sailor before, but I’d heard their nibs were supposedly finer … even than Pilot’s. So I opted for a medium nib when I bought my first. I like the pen a lot — it’s a terrific writer! The thing is, though, as time has gone by, I find myself more and more drawn to a finer nib, and this 14k lays down a line that is just a tad too broad for my taste now.

DSC_2326So … after some time, I thought I’d go for a Professional Gear. I didn’t have any preferences, whether I wanted ‘slim’ or not … wouldn’t really have mattered to me, but I wanted a fine nib and 21K. This was one of those times when I was really thankful for the Facebook fountain pen groups; I had a long, almost chat-like discussion with a bunch of helpful people there, with regards to the nib width. This particular purchase worried me a little, because I’d seen the one I wanted, it was quite the investment for my budget, it came from Japan [via Amazon]. Okay, I would always have been protected by Amazon, but it would be quite a hassle to return something to Japan.

Anyway, all those worries were wasted energy, it turned out. It arrived on the day it was scheduled, and I’m almost at loss of words!!! This is a fine nib, alright, but it’s smooth and it has just that wee bit of feedback that I love [this is a very personal thing]. I’m still in control, and when writing on, for example, Midori paper or Leuchtturm, I can hear it — just like you can while writing with a lead pencil — while still maintaining its smoothness! It’s divine 🙂 I’ve tried it on all types of paper I have at home; Tomoe River, Clairefontaine, Rhodia, Midori, Leuchtturm and Apica. All good! In fact, it feels better to write on Rhodia than it ever did before.

I’ve tried four or five inks in it, and it doesn’t seem to matter what I throw at it. Monteverde Charoite was great, so was Diamine Imperial Blue … right now I have Sailor Ultramarine.

DSC_2323My pen is matte black with chrome trim. That, plus the bi-colour nib … the understated beauty of it, was partly what made me so drawn to it in the first place. I can’t tell exactly what it’s made of … must be some kind of metal that has been anodized to this soft black matte. It’s light. I can’t think of one single, negative thing to say about this pen. I’m in love!

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8 thoughts on “fine sailor”

  1. She – is it acceptable to call your pen “she” – Bekah? She is truly beautiful Rebekah; I truly love the classic combination of matte black and incredible high-polished silver! But that nib! (Well I can’t wait to see the lovely script that flows from her jewelled nib: )

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    1. Hey Deb, It’s been ages since I used this website. I wrote this post as a kind of ‘review’ to post to the group. Yes, this pen was a wonderful surprise — what a delight it is … the feeling of this nib gliding over the paper. There actually are _some_ I refer to as he or she 😀

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      1. Well, what really grabbed my attention is how you compared the feel of the nib to the sound and feel to that of a pencil lead on paper – because that is exactly how I judge the function of a writing instrument as well… Whether the script flows effortlessly from my mind to the paper; fluidly, without any thought to the process or mechanics involved: )

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      2. Yes, I find that to be the important part to me — there are so many fountain pens out there, designed with lots of bling, costing thousands of $$, and I’m so not interested. It’s the behaviour of the nib [and the construction of the grip section] I care about. The more understated design the better in my books.

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      3. EXACTLY how I would describe the way I want any tool to function (I am a tool nut; ). Give me function over form, any day! I don’t mind paying extra for something that will literally last me a lifetime. (The cost is minimal when you look at it that way, hey?; )

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